Romance of the 18th century

This is a theme-based blog about the 18th century, with main focus on the swedish nobleman Axel von Fersen, the rumoured lover of queen Marie Antoinette. Side history and period-related art is also featured.

marie antoinette + pink
(reuquested by anonymous)

(via i-am-mysterier)

godsavethefrenchqueen:

Marie Antoinette + blue

Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola)

(via vivelareine)

A memorial stone outside of Ljungs kyrka, dedicated to the von Fersen family who lies buried inside the church. This stone was raised on the initiative of the owner of Ljungs slott, who I had the honor of meeting during my brief visit to this church. 
The von Fersen family were long in high power in Sweden, second only to the king, right until the beginning of the 19th century, when Axel von Fersen jr was beat to death by an angry mob in Stockholm, wrongfully suspected of the murder of the crown prince. 
The last of the von Fersens died in 1879. 

Interior of Ljungs kyrka, the church funded and run by the von Fersen family, and the place where most of them lie buried. The family tomb itself was blocked up during the 1970’s. It is located just beneath the altar, below the carpet up ahead.

The bottom picture shows the Fersen weapon shield, hanging on a wall inside the church.

Although I did take my own pictures, I have choosen not to use them out of respect to the church. These pictures are from wikipedia.

top picture source:

bottom picture source:


A plaque located in Ljungs kyrka, Linköping, bearing the names of all von Fersen- family members who are buried here. Among them are the church’s funder, Fredrik Axel von Fersen, his wife Hedvig Catharina, and three of their children; Axel von Fersen jr, Sophie Piper and Fabian von Fersen. Their elder sister, Hedvig Eleonora, lies buried in Italy.

My visit to this church was quite interesting - not only did it feel very special to be standing at the burial spot of so many great historical people, but the events leading up to this visit were also quite special.
When my dad and I arrived to the church, it was closed, so we decided to come back later. After a brief visit to Ljungs slott, we found that the church was still closed, so we started asking the few people we could find nearby when it opened, and one older woman answered that a man living in a house right next to the church should have the key. She helped us find the right house, and it all felt like something out of the ‘Da Vinci code’, as it soon turned out that this woman was in fact the owner of Ljungs slott, where we had just been. 
She gave us a private tour of the church, after we had found out that the von Fersen tomb was not actually visible - it had been blocked up in the 1970’s sometime. I was very disappointed to learn this, but I think she was more upset than I was; she complained very much about the attitude of Svenska kyrkan, about how they refused to let the tomb of a person such as Axel von Fersen be visible to visitors, even when, as she said, there were so many.
I did take pictures of the insides of the church itself, but I don’t think I’ll upload them out of respect to her, so that they’ll be for private use only.

A plaque located in Ljungs kyrka, Linköping, bearing the names of all von Fersen- family members who are buried here. Among them are the church’s funder, Fredrik Axel von Fersen, his wife Hedvig Catharina, and three of their children; Axel von Fersen jr, Sophie Piper and Fabian von Fersen. Their elder sister, Hedvig Eleonora, lies buried in Italy.

My visit to this church was quite interesting - not only did it feel very special to be standing at the burial spot of so many great historical people, but the events leading up to this visit were also quite special.

When my dad and I arrived to the church, it was closed, so we decided to come back later. After a brief visit to Ljungs slott, we found that the church was still closed, so we started asking the few people we could find nearby when it opened, and one older woman answered that a man living in a house right next to the church should have the key. She helped us find the right house, and it all felt like something out of the ‘Da Vinci code’, as it soon turned out that this woman was in fact the owner of Ljungs slott, where we had just been. 

She gave us a private tour of the church, after we had found out that the von Fersen tomb was not actually visible - it had been blocked up in the 1970’s sometime. I was very disappointed to learn this, but I think she was more upset than I was; she complained very much about the attitude of Svenska kyrkan, about how they refused to let the tomb of a person such as Axel von Fersen be visible to visitors, even when, as she said, there were so many.

I did take pictures of the insides of the church itself, but I don’t think I’ll upload them out of respect to her, so that they’ll be for private use only.

The exterior of Ljungs kyrka in Linköping, where the entire von Fersen family, with the exception of Hedvig Eleonora, lies buried. 

Although there has been a church on this location since the 12th century, the basis for this modern church was laid at the end of the 18th century, when Fredrik Axel von Fersen funded the rebuilding of a new church in the 1790’s. However, since he died in 1794, he never got to see ‘his’ new church completed. Today, him and most of his family members up to the 1830’s, are buried here, beneath the altar. 

source

Photography: historyvonfersen

The monument of Axel von Fersen, erected upon his death in 1810 by his sister, Sophie Piper.

The plaque reads; "To an unforgettable brother; the bravery in his last moments, 20th June 1810, bear witness to his virtues and tranquillity."

Löfstad, 2014 (c)

Upon his death, Sophie Piper had a monument of her brother, Axel von Fersen, raised in the gardens of Löfstad Castle. These pictures show the approach towards the monument.

Approaching this, I felt my heart beating very fast, as I’ve been waiting to come and see this place for a very long time. It was a strange feeling to stand there, and view it.

Interiors from Löfstad castle, Norrköping, preserved the way they were in 1940, when the last owner, Emilie Piper, died and left it to the state. The first picture shows a working room/salon; the second picture is the working room of the servants, below stairs.

(c) 2014

bacchitempel:

Hans Axel von Fersen d.y. (1755-1810) Miniature painting by Gabriel Jean Joseph Hubert Le Monnier (1761-1853) copy after a painting by Carl Fredric von Breda (1759-1818)  Gouache  NMGrh 1487 Nationalmuseum, Stockholm

bacchitempel:

Hans Axel von Fersen d.y. (1755-1810)
Miniature painting by Gabriel Jean Joseph Hubert Le Monnier (1761-1853) copy after a painting by Carl Fredric von Breda (1759-1818)
Gouache
NMGrh 1487
Nationalmuseum, Stockholm