Romance of the 18th century

This is a theme-based blog about the 18th century, with main focus on the swedish nobleman Axel von Fersen, the rumoured lover of queen Marie Antoinette. Side history and period-related art is also featured.

September 26th, 1791, Marie Antoinette to Axel von Fersen;
"Your letter of the 28th has reached me. For two months I have had no news of you; no one could tell me where you were. I was at the point, if I had known her address, of writing to Sophie [Fersen’s sister, mistress of the robes to the queen of Sweden] 
[…] We are here in a new position since the king’s acceptance [of the constitution]; to refuse it would have been nobler, but that was impossible under the circumstances in which we are. I could have wished that the acceptance were simple and shorter, but that is the misfortune of being surrounded by villains; indeed, I assure you it was the least bad project they presented. 
[…]As soon as you are in Brussels, let me know; I will write to you simply; for I have a sure means always at my orders. You could never imagine how much all that I do in these days costs me; and yet, this vile race of men, who say they are attached to us and to whom we have never done harm, are furious at this moment; it seems as though one must have a base soul to do with satisfaction that to which one is forced; and it is their[…] and their conduct which has dragged us into the position in which we now are. I have had but one happiness, that of seeing once more the men who were imprisoned for us, - especially M. Goguelat; [officer who assisted the correspondence between royalists] he is perfectly reasonable and his head has become balanced under his imprisonment.”

September 26th, 1791, Marie Antoinette to Axel von Fersen;

"Your letter of the 28th has reached me. For two months I have had no news of you; no one could tell me where you were. I was at the point, if I had known her address, of writing to Sophie [Fersen’s sister, mistress of the robes to the queen of Sweden

[…] We are here in a new position since the king’s acceptance [of the constitution]; to refuse it would have been nobler, but that was impossible under the circumstances in which we are. I could have wished that the acceptance were simple and shorter, but that is the misfortune of being surrounded by villains; indeed, I assure you it was the least bad project they presented. 

[…]As soon as you are in Brussels, let me know; I will write to you simply; for I have a sure means always at my orders. You could never imagine how much all that I do in these days costs me; and yet, this vile race of men, who say they are attached to us and to whom we have never done harm, are furious at this moment; it seems as though one must have a base soul to do with satisfaction that to which one is forced; and it is their[…] and their conduct which has dragged us into the position in which we now are. I have had but one happiness, that of seeing once more the men who were imprisoned for us, - especially M. Goguelat; [officer who assisted the correspondence between royalists] he is perfectly reasonable and his head has become balanced under his imprisonment.”

  • 26 September 2013
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